Tag Archives: Percussion

Percussion

Lamellophones

A lamellophone is any instrument that has a series of thin plates, or tongues. Each of which is fixed at one end and the other end of the plat remains free. When the musician depresses the free end of the plate with a finger or fingernail, and then allows for the finger to slip off. The released plate vibrates producing sound.

The instrument has a series of thin plates, or “tongues”, each of which is fixed at one end and has the other end free. When the musician depresses the free end of a plate with a finger or fingernail, and then allows the finger to slip off, the released plate vibrates.

Lamellophones by their construction are equipped with one or more tongues or lamellar that produce sound from being plucked by the performer. There are two main categories of plucked idiophones that are in the form of a frame [121] or in the form of a comb [122.].

Khartal

Name: Khartal.
Type: Idiophones > Percussion > Clappers.
Hornbostel-Sachs No#: 111.12
Area: Rajasthan, Odisha etc.
Country: India.
Region: South Asia.

Description: The Khartal [in Dev: ] is an ancient instrument, mainly used in devotional and or folk songs. The name of the instrument derives from the Sanskrit words “Kara” meaning hand and “tala” meaning clapping. This instrument is a Ghana Vadya.

Construction: The khartal is usually made of wood or metal, a khartal player usually holds one ‘male’ and ‘female’ khartal in each hand. The ‘male’ khartal is usually thicker and is held with the thumb. While the ‘female’ khartal is usually thinner and is mainly balanced on the ring finger, which represents the element.

A pair of wooden castanets with bells attached to them was the earliest form of the khartal. These pieces of wood are not connected in any way. They can be clapped together at high speeds to make rapid, complex rhythms. Aside from being an excellent accompaniment instrument, the khartal is valued for being a highly portable percussion instrument.

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