Tag Archives: Idioglots

Rangoyd

Name: Rangoyd.
Type: Idiophones > Lamellophones > Idioglot > Jawharps > Tension >
Hornbostel-Sachs No#: 121.21
Area: Peninsular Malaysia.
Country: Malaysia.
Region: South East Asia.

Description: The Rangoyd is an idioglot jawharp that is played by the Lanoh people of Peninsular Malaysia. Analagous to the related jawharp, the rangun of the Jahai people in Vietnam. As such this instrument is used in addressing the forest spirits.

Construction: The Rangoyd is made from the midrib of a palm leaf and played by pulling a short length of rattan string attached to the end of the instrument.

Citations: Bibliography: Websites: Oxford museum online / Rangoyd article byTrân Quang Hai, revised by Patricia Matusky ;

Knobe Oh

Name: Knobe Oh.
Type: Idiophones > Lamellophones > Idioglot > Jawharps > Tension >
Hornbostel-Sachs No#: 121.21
Area: Babotin, Belu Regency, Timor.
Country: Timor Leste.
Region: South East Asia.

Description: The Dawan people call the Knobe Oh [knobe meaning “mouth harp” and oh means “bamboo”]. This instrument belongs to the family of jawharps called “tension harps, or tension jawharps”. It is related to the gengga lawe from West Sulawesi and the genggong of Bali and Lombok.

Construction: the instrument is a strip of bamboo out of which as been carved a “tongue” [Mamana in the Dawan language] which is set to vibration by a a string [tani] pulled firmly to the side.

Citations: Bibliography: Websites: Palmer Keen / Aurelarchipelago.com / knobe oh ~ YouTube /

Kubing

Name: Kubing.
Type: Idiophones > Lamellophones > Idioglots > Jawharps >
Hornbostel-Sachs No#: 121.21
Country: Philippines.
Region: South East Asia.

Description: The kubing is an idioglotic Jawharp, [i.e. made of the same material] The kubing is played throughout the Philippines.

Etymology: The distribution of this instrument is quite wide as the name of the instrument is known in many of the languages. In the region of Northern Luzon, the Bontok people call the kubing  “alibao or abiteng”, the Dumagat people a sub group of the Aeyta people in the Philippines call it the aribao or uribao ; the Ifugao people call it the “biqqung, bi-ong” and the Isneg people call it “kulibao, or kulibbao” ; the Kalinga people call it the “ulibao, ullibaw or onnat” ; In central Luzon the names for the kubing include – the  Aeyta people call it the “kullibaw or kulibao”.

The Mangyan people call it the “kinaban” and furthest south in Mindanao the Bagobo people call it the “kumbing” ; the B’laan people call it the “kubing” ; the Higanon people call it the “kulaing” ; the Mamanua people call it the “subing” the Manobo people call it the “kubing, or suding” ; the manaska people call it the “kubing” ; the Maranaw people call it “kubing” ; the Samal people call it “kulaing” ; vSubanen people call it “kubing” ; The Tagakolo people call it “kulaing” ; the Tausug people call it “Kulaing” ; the T’boli people call it “kumbing” ; the Teduray people also call it “kulaing” and lastly the Yakan people call it “Kulaeng or kulaing”.

Construction:

Citations: Bibliography: Gongs & bamboo: a panorama of Philippine music instruments by Jose Montserrat Maceda ISBN: Diliman,