Tag Archives: Combs

Combs

Oopoochawa

Name: Oopoochawa.
Type: Idiophones > Percussion > Lamellophones > Combs.
Hornbostel-Sachs No#: 122.1
Keys:
Height:
Length:
Width:
Country: Argentina.
Region:  South America.

Description:

Citations: Bibliography: Websites: Cirio, Norberto Pablo. “Tinta Negra En El Gris De Ayer.” Investigaciones De La Biblioteca Nacional 0.0 [2009]: n. pag. Web ;

Agidigbo

Name: Agidigbo.
Type: Idiophones > Percussion > Lamellophones > Combs.
Hornbostel-Sachs No#: 122.1
Keys:
Length:
Width:
Country: Nigeria.
Region:  Africa.

Description: the agidigbo is a large plucked lamellophone that is played by the Yoruba people of Nigeria. It is worn around the neck of the player who then supports or braces the instrument. The body of the agidigbo is a rectangular wooden box that is by his chest or thoracic region.

The agidigbo is most popular in the Ibadan and Ijebu areas of Yorubaland. The drummer Babatunde Olatunji famously played an agidigbo on “Oyin Momo Ado” [Sweet as Honey] which is track 7 on his 1959 Drums of Passion album.

Playing Techniques: The player wears a thick “ring” usually a bottle neck, on his thumb, which he uses to tap the sides of the wooden box. He then uses his ten fingers to pluck the instruments metal tongues, producing very sonorous tones as he accompanies a sekera, waka or apala band.

Citation: Bibliography: Websites:

Mbira

Name: Mbira.
Type: Idiophones > Percussion > Lamellophones > Combs.
Hornbostel-Sachs No#: 122.1
Keys:
Length:
Width:
Country: Zimbabwe.
Region:  Africa.

Mbira
Mbira ~ Photographed by Graeme Gibson @ Horniman Museum, London, UK 2019 ;

Description: The Mbira [pronounced as m’ beer a]  is family of plucked lamellophones that are found in Zimbabwe. They are played by the Shona people and are considered traditional. Mbira consist of a wooden board often fitted with a resonator usually of gourd. It is attached with staggered metal tines.

It is often an important instrument played at religious ceremonies, weddings, and other social gatherings.

Playing Technique: The mbira is held between the left and right hand. It is plucked mostly with the fingers and thumbs at a minimum. The right fore finger for most mbira and sometimes the left fore finger. The Mbira is often accompanied by a rattle made of gourd called a hosho.

Tuning:

Construction:

Citation: Bibliography: The Soul of Mbira by Paul F. Berliner ~ University of California Press Berkeley 94720 – ISBN: 0-520-04268-9 Websites:

Ikembe

Name: Ikembe.
Type: Idiophones > Percussion > Lamellophones > Comb.
Hornbostel-Sachs No#: 122.1
Keys:
Length:
Width:
Area:
Country: Rwanda, Burundi & Congo
Region: Africa.

Description: The iKembe is a plucked musical instrument from the lamellophone group. It is common amongst the people of Rwanda, Burundi and Congo. 

Nomenclature: In Swahili the word imba means song. Kuimba means to sing, as in the phrase “nitakwenda kuimba” [I go to sing]. Swahili, as in many languages, uses a type of binomial nomenclature to create new words to describe unfamiliar or new objects, occurrences or people, based on existing words or concepts. 

By combining part of the word for mother = ma with the word for song = imba using r as a connector we come up with the word marimba = mother of song. We can then extrapolate from the research of A.M. Jones, quoted by Osborne that ka = small combined with the word imba = song should mean little mother of song.

Naming: The names for this instrument are plentiful. Variations among the names include – likimbe, or likembe [as it the ikembe is called among the Amba people of Uganda and the Tabura of the Congo Basin. The name lulimba is found among the [Yao people of Malawi, Tanzania, Tanzania and Mozambique].

The name itshilimba is used by the Bemba people of Zambia, or karimba in Zimbabwe or Kalimba and ikembe Bahutu of Rwanda and Burundi. Numerous names are known for this instrument although the predominance of names with this root is undeniable. The spelling is not as important as the sound that is made in vocalizing the names.

Citations: Bibliography: Websites: